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Hi.

I'm Bri Garbani, a designer + photographer living in San Diego, California. It's here that I express my passion for dogs, design + DIY through writing + photography. If you like what you see, you'll want to check back often as I have a constant need to create + Native Blonde is my prime creative outlet.

Tree Stump Nesting Tables

Tree Stump Nesting Tables

The moment I saw this photo by The Art of Doing Stuff, I knew I had to have my own DIY style stump table.  I immediately looked up the nearest lumber yard, drove there + had a bulldozer haul a massive stump to my car where it took four people to load it into my backseat.  After handing the attendant a $10 bill, I drove off with a big smile on my face, thrilled that I was about to embark on such a cool DIY project.

I was barely able to roll the stump out of the back seat of my car (+ I dented the door in doing so).  The dogs were ecstatic that I had brought a giant stick home for them, although, I think they were disappointed when they figured out that they could not fit their mouths around it.

After a solid six months of letting the wood dry out, I finally got around to pulling off the bark.  I did just what The Art of Doing Stuff had recommended - I used a hammer + a chisel.  During this process I discovered quite a few bugs still living in the stump, so I slopped some wood stain on it to kill the critters + let it sit for another six months.  The amount of time this project sat unfinished in my garage was never intentional - life just got really busy!

Once the bugs were gone, it was time to get to going on this thing!  I was concerned that the stump was entirely too heavy to leave it as it was, so I had to revise my plan (insert chainsaw into tool lineup).  The Mr. cut the wood into four slabs of varying widths for me, two of which I used to complete this project.

That’s when the real work began - sanding the wood.  If you’re doing this project yourself, sand until you think your hands are going to fall off.  When they do, put them back on + keep sanding.  I’m so thankful that I had help because it probably took at least 10 hours of sanding get the finish I desired.  Don’t even get me started on how difficult it was to make each slab level.  Two different sanders + a multitude of paper grits were used to get the job done.

I had originally planned to buy some steel hairpin legs to complete my table set, but I opted not to in order to keep this project as cost effective as possible.  Luckily, my dad is a skilled welder with access to steel scraps.  I asked him to keep an eye out for materials that I could use as table bases + sure enough, he had options for me to choose from.  After I came up with a design plan, we got to work!  The guys polished the steel while I supervised (from inside the house, sitting in the air conditioning, occasionally coming out into the 105 degree heat to snap a few photos + ensure quality control).

Next I added sealant to the wood.  Once several coats were on, I decided that I didn’t like the look of the polished steel legs with the natural wood after all (sorry that all that hard work went to waste guys!), so I bought spray paint in a deep oil rubbed bronze finish to coat the table bases with.  If you’re doing this project yourself, you can leave the legs in a polished state as long as you use a rust resistant product on the metal.

A light sanding, one more round of poly + my wood stump tables are finally finished!  

This DIY furniture project was super cheap to make since I only spent $30 total on supplies.  Yeah, they’re not perfect.  But to purchase something similar in a retail store would run you a couple hundred dollars.  Besides, to know that they were handmade by me plus a couple of people that I love dearly is priceless.  Take a look, aren’t they absolutely gorgeous?!  And Duke assists in modeling them pretty nicely too!

 

Mini Cement Planter Pots

Mini Cement Planter Pots

Knotted T-Shirt Dog Toy

Knotted T-Shirt Dog Toy